What are the winning strategies to scale your B2B business on Linkedin?

I invited Erendiz Ates, CEO of AZ-Solutions and Linkedin Ambassador to ask him all the questions that executives keep asking me:

  • Should you post as a person or as a company?
  • How to reshare posts for the most impact?
  • How should your ideal LinkedIn profile look like?  Should you brand your LinkedIn profile?
  • Personal branding versus company branding?  How to do Thought leadership via LinkedIn?
  • Should you worry about headhunters stealing your best staff …

Listen to the podcast or read the full transcript below.

How to scale your B2B business on Linkedin

Michael Humblet:
Welcome to the Sales Acceleration Show. My name is Michael Humblet, and I’m the founder of Chaomatic. In this show, we’ll try and do everything to accelerate your business. One of the biggest topics that keep coming back is LinkedIn. We once did a show about LinkedIn a whole time ago, but it’s about time we talk about LinkedIn. So I’ve invited … How do you pronounce your name properly?

Erendiz Ates:
Erendiz.

Michael Humblet:
Erendiz.

Erendiz Ates:
Erendiz.

Michael Humblet:
So I’ve invited Erendiz. It’s a tough one in English. Maybe explain to our viewers what you do.

Erendiz Ates:
My name is Erendiz and I help companies, small companies, with boosting their brand with LinkedIn and social media.

Michael Humblet:
I heard you are a LinkedIn ambassador?

Erendiz Ates:
Yes, since April of this year I’m one of the LinkedIn ambassadors in Belgium.

Michael Humblet:
So you eat, dream, sleep LinkedIn.

Erendiz Ates:
Even during sex.

Michael Humblet:
Okay, hang on a minute. No, so seriously, so let me ask you the questions they ask me so we can see how we can help people to scale their business on LinkedIn. Why should I be on LinkedIn when I’m in B2B?

Erendiz Ates:
It’s good that you asked, good that you say B2B because I really think LinkedIn, if you’re active on LinkedIn as a company, personal or corporate, you can grow in brand awareness. You can approach decision-makers on LinkedIn. And especially in 2018 now, we can see that the two social media channels that are really growing our Instagram and LinkedIn. So if you’re active in business-to-business, your presence on LinkedIn is key, so yeah.

Michael Humblet:
Let me ask you immediately a tough question. I have a company. Should I post as a company or should I post as Michael Humblet? Because if I post, I’ll tell you what happens, if I post as a company nothing happens, but if I post as Michael Humblet I got a lot of visitors and I got a lot of traction. So what do I do?

Erendiz Ates:
I really love that question because a lot of companies, what do they do? They post on their company page, the marketing agencies. They outsource it, they post on the company page, Facebook, LinkedIn, and they sit back and they wait for likes, engagements. Nothing happens.

Michael Humblet:
Nothing happens.

Erendiz Ates:
On LinkedIn, it’s all about the personal brand. So even as a company, you have to focus on the personal branding of your brand ambassadors and your employers. So if you want to post something on LinkedIn, yeah, you can post on your company page a couple of times a week. So you can have a content strategy for your company page, but it’s very important to post on a personal level because it’s the human touch. People make a connection with the person, and not with the logo.

Michael Humblet:
I absolutely agree. But then the question comes when I say this stuff, then the question is, “So, Michael, you’re saying that my entire sales team and marketing and … as many people as possible should build their personal brand on LinkedIn?” Agreed, or not?

Erendiz Ates:
Not everybody, but you have to … Like, personal branding, the first thing you can do is update the profiles of all your employers. That’s step one. So if you create an identity, consistent corporate identity for every employer, that’s the first step you have to do.

Michael Humblet:
So immediately, another question, the background.

Erendiz Ates:
Very important.

Michael Humblet:
The question everybody asks me. If we go for the [inaudible 00:03:14] leadership personal brand approach, should I then have a company logo in the background or not? Should it be a corporate or should it be a personal approach? I told you I would ask you a tough question.

Erendiz Ates:
Yes, I love it, I love it. It can be on a corporate level. So if you put your logo on it, in a subtle way, it’s no issue. But I really like … There are a lot of companies I’ve worked with, they make five, four or five banners, like backgrounds, and they let the employers choose which one they want to put on their LinkedIn. Because LinkedIn is the property of the person itself. It’s not your property as a manager. So we have to give them some room to choose from. But I really believe in a consistent approach, also on a corporate level. So if the personal brand is strong, you will benefit as a company also. As a corporate brand.

Michael Humblet:
So in essence, you’re saying, it’s okay.

Erendiz Ates:
Definitely okay, but don’t exaggerate.

Michael Humblet:
So not really really corporate. Yeah, yeah.

Erendiz Ates:
Like, really corporate.

Michael Humblet:
Because then you’re selling, and selling doesn’t work.

Erendiz Ates:
I really like it when I see people on the pictures like some of your employers, you have four or five banners, you can show your employers … I want to see a connection with faces, and not just only your logo.

Michael Humblet:
I agree because I believe the future of sales is facing because people trust people so you need the faces and it needs to be a nice picture, no drinking … Sometimes you see pictures like, “Come on.” So let me ask you another question in that context. The same people ask me, say, “Okay, Michael, so I have backgrounds, I made a decision. Five, six backgrounds, actually a pretty interesting idea, I think. But I’m afraid if my guys or girls start posting and start building the brand, head hunters will phone them and will steal them. What should I do?”

Erendiz Ates:
That’s fear of a lot of managers and entrepreneurs. They say, “If I brand my people, they will go away.”

Michael Humblet:
Yeah, and they’ll take the IP or whatever the identity along.

Erendiz Ates:
Yes. But we are now in 2018. Point. So if I want to leave …

Michael Humblet:
Live with it.

Erendiz Ates:
If I want to leave my company, I will leave my company. We are not in … in 2018, it’s common that we change work in a couple years. So we find other employees, it’s natural. So I don’t think you have to sit on the same place a couple of years.

Michael Humblet:
I gave an answer, I said, “Listen if they are not happy, they’re going to go anyway.”

Erendiz Ates:
Yeah. So I don’t think that is a … you have to fear that one. No. It’s not an issue. But it’s an issue for a lot of businesses here in Belgium.

Michael Humblet:
Yeah, but I mean, it’s …

Erendiz Ates:
Because it’s difficult to find talent in 2018.

Michael Humblet:
And keeping it.

Erendiz Ates:
And keeping it. But if you work on your employee advocacy, so you give them tools, you give them trust to brand themselves on LinkedIn, I think actually, they will love working for you. Because you give them the freedom to carry your brand.

Michael Humblet:
Let me ask you some even more pragmatic questions. How many times should you post? Because that’s a typical one. Instagram would be like, every single second of the day. But LinkedIn is very different. What would be your advice?

Erendiz Ates:
My advice? My first advice is before you post on LinkedIn, the first thing you need to do is to build your identity on LinkedIn. I’m going to answer your question, but everyone thinks, “Okay, I’ll post three times a week and magic will happen.” But actually, the first thing you need to do is build your identity. So your personal brand has to be top-notch. What is your personal brand? Like you said before, background, a good profile pic, a headline with keywords, a short summary, yeah? And then so if someone likes your content …

Michael Humblet:
Keep the flow of your thinking.

Erendiz Ates:
Yeah, I’m in the flow.

Michael Humblet:
The short summary?

Erendiz Ates:
Yeah.

Michael Humblet:
Should it be about you or the company? And secondly, make your life even more, sometimes people speak in the third person, like “Michael Humblet is a senior …”

Erendiz Ates:
Stop it. No. No, no, no. Nope.

Michael Humblet:
No?

Erendiz Ates:
No.

Michael Humblet:
So personal?

Erendiz Ates:
Personal.

Michael Humblet:
Short and sweet or long for SEO purposes?

Erendiz Ates:
If you do it in a … like a story, if you tell a story, then you can do it the long way. Like a personal story, why? Who is Michael Humblet? Why is he doing what he’s doing now? So a personal story, I really like the personal connection. So if you believe in something like quotes or if you have a pragmatic way of doing things, or if do you like the personal approach? Do you like networking? You can put it on your LinkedIn so if I visit your profile, I see okay, this is important for Michael. I can make a connection with you.

Michael Humblet:
Okay. So you can continue now. Sorry, I’m cutting …

Erendiz Ates:
Summary, your personal page is very important on LinkedIn.

Michael Humblet:
Yeah, I agree.

Erendiz Ates:
And on the next phase, of course, like, I have three steps on LinkedIn. Step one is to build your identity, like your personal brand. Step two, build your network, boost your network because you have …

Michael Humblet:
I wanted to ask that one. That’s the key.

Erendiz Ates:
You have to have reached, yeah? You have to create many ambassadors in your network. So if you connect with people, you add a personal note during or after connecting, yeah? And you don’t do hard selling. Never.

Michael Humblet:
No, I fully agree.

Erendiz Ates:
Never never.

Michael Humblet:
Not selling is the new sales, right?

Erendiz Ates:
So just …

Michael Humblet:
Value.

Erendiz Ates:
Thank somebody for adding you to their network. And okay, in a subtle way, you can add your website [crosstalk 00:08:44].

Michael Humblet:
You’re saying proactively go at people, or not?

Erendiz Ates:
Not everybody is in a luxury position that there’s always inbound connection requests, so sometimes you have to prospect yourself and add people. So what do I do? You go to the newsfeed and if you see something interesting or some person who has interesting content, I add them to my network. So if you have like a hundred, 200 connections on your LinkedIn, don’t expect your content to go viral. So you have to have reached. But the reach has to be … quality is more important than quantity. [crosstalk 00:09:16]

Michael Humblet:
So I wanted to ask you because you have, of course, tools that can automate some of this. You in favor or you’re against it or …

Erendiz Ates:
Against.

Michael Humblet:
Against.

Erendiz Ates:
Yes.

Michael Humblet:
Because it’s not natural.

Erendiz Ates:
It’s not, you can see it’s not the real, personal, sincere approach. You can automate something, like if you … the text, you don’t have to type it all again, all again. I know we don’t have time. But like, I really dislike it when somebody misspells my name, for example, or call me Rodriguez or Hernandez. You have to give a couple of seconds sincere attention to the person you are connecting with.

Erendiz Ates:
So emotional connection is very important, so on the long term, they get to know you, Erendiz added me, and they automatically will go to your profile, they will look, “Oh, Erendiz is a LinkedIn trainer.” Your profile is up to date, it’s [inaudible 00:10:07] up, it’s cool. In the next phase, if your network likes you in some kind of way, you give value, then they will like your content. The content is the third phase. It’s identity, networking, content.

Michael Humblet:
Jumping to content, I see posts, some people that get a lot of likes, and I’m always thinking, “The moment somebody shares your stuff or somebody else, it actually has even a higher value because it means they are actually exposing themselves, saying, ‘Look, look, I really like this.'” Is that the right way to think or are you saying no, no, no, likes is enough, just …

Erendiz Ates:
If they like your content, it’s a good beginning. Yeah? So if you post something like a video or a picture or just plain text, it works also, just text. Storytelling is very [crosstalk 00:10:58].

Michael Humblet:
I’ve seen the biggest post actually are plain text.

Erendiz Ates:
Plain text, so it works. Because you tell a story. Because marketing nowadays, or branding, is not about selling your stuff on LinkedIn, but it’s more about telling a story.

Michael Humblet:
The problem, if you say that to an executive, he’s going to say, “Yeah, but I’m spending … my guys or girls are spending time when can I see a return?” And you’re basically saying, “Well, it’s kind of going to go …” I mean, it’s a tough one.

Erendiz Ates:
Yes, it’s a tough one, I know. And it’s a real mindset change. But in the long term, and for some people and for some business in the short term, you can accelerate the revenues for a business. Likes are important, but comments, very important.

Michael Humblet:
Interaction.

Erendiz Ates:
Interactions, engagement. Triggering people to react to your post is very important. And sharing in the third phase is good, but you have to think when are you sharing something of another person?

Michael Humblet:
Yeah, when it’s really valuable, that I think my network can benefit from. I recently shared the latest LinkedIn Grow Tech stuff because I really thought, “Damn, I didn’t even know this existed.” Right?

Erendiz Ates:
So that’s the mindset.

Michael Humblet:
One of the techniques that I’ve seen a lot is that … so you do a post, you add some text, for instance, and then they start adding people. At Peter, at Kim, at you, at me. But then if it one time, I’m all fine, and then I’ll actually endorse it. But I have guys that have been doing this for six months and they put me in every post. And I’m thinking, “Guys, it just doesn’t make sense.”

Erendiz Ates:
Just send them a message to stop it, man. I do it sometimes, but you have to tag people when it’s relevant to them.

Michael Humblet:
Absolutely. I mean, you guys tagged me recently and it just made sense because then you ask, “@Michael, what do you think?” And of course, I have to answer, so it’s like …

Erendiz Ates:
It’s your cup of tea, you know? So you want … when you see that, you want to react.

Michael Humblet:
Yeah, it’s human behavior.

Erendiz Ates:
So it’s not reacting because, “Oh yeah, Erendiz tagged me so I have to react.” No, it’s something of your niche you want to react. You have an opinion on it and you can tag people. But not to get more engagement, it’s the wrong approach. I see it a lot because now, my network is growing also, and I see some of the people tagging me on everything, every post. Sometimes it’s relevant, but sometimes not. Now I’m on a point that it’s … when somebody spams me, one or two times, I stop reacting and even …

Michael Humblet:
Email them like, “Leave me alone.”

Erendiz Ates:
Yeah, just … [crosstalk 00:13:34].

Michael Humblet:
Another question. Very typical. If you look to Twitter, I think Twitter has died in our region, because everybody was putting a bot on it and then resharing. Resharing. Yeah, Twitter is resharing. I see a lot of people doing the same on LinkedIn. Classically, corporate posts something, the HQ, and then I’m the sales guy, I’m going to repost this and I’m thinking, “Man, how should we do repost?” Is there a good way of doing it or not? Should you or shouldn’t you?

Erendiz Ates:
Reposting something from a company page could be good, for example, if you have a job offer, you’re putting it on your company page, the employers or … not only the HR, but the brand ambassadors, can repost it or share it in their network. But your reach, your organic reach will not be that much. The best thing always is, and that’s, to come back to your question, the first question, how many times you have to post on LinkedIn in a week.

Michael Humblet:
Closing the loop, my friend. You’ve been paying attention!

Erendiz Ates:
Yeah, of course. I think the average entrepreneur, we’re all busy, I know, has to have one kickass post a week. So you have to pick one day a week and that post should be kickass. You have to put all your time in it, your energy in it. It could be a video, could be text.

Michael Humblet:
And always a [inaudible 00:14:58]. So like, consistent.

Erendiz Ates:
Consistent. Like, mine is Thursday.

Michael Humblet:
Mine’s Wednesday. This show, right? Every Wednesday, that’s how we started doing this show, because we said, “I need something proper to post.” And I wanted to add people, so I could benefit from their reach and their network. I mean, that was the whole idea. And then it kind of went out of hand, crazy, hoping, that’s how you ended up in this chair. So one day. Yours is Thursday.

Erendiz Ates:
Thursday, and of course, the other days, like two or three times a week minimum. [crosstalk 00:15:27]

Michael Humblet:
Because I scaled the whole thing … a whole long time, one post.

Erendiz Ates:
One kickass post, and the other two …

Michael Humblet:
Yeah, I did one kickass post.

Erendiz Ates:
The other two posts, you can reshare something from somebody else.

Michael Humblet:
[inaudible 00:15:39] yeah.

Erendiz Ates:
That’s really enough. I’m very active on LinkedIn, but sometimes I see people posting five times a day.

Michael Humblet:
That’s crazy.

Erendiz Ates:
The reaction in my mind is, “Don’t they have other things to do?” You don’t want your target audience think that this is the only thing you do. So two or three times a week, but one kickass content. Me, Thursday, so everybody tune in Thursday.

Michael Humblet:
Yep. Thursday. Is there a point … How to say … No, is there a time you should not post? I have a strong opinion on this, by the way, because I tried a lot. I’m very curious.

Erendiz Ates:
I really don’t believe in time slots that you have to post something.

Michael Humblet:
I do believe there is a phase when you should not post, actually.

Erendiz Ates:
Yeah, not post, yeah. Like on LinkedIn, I’ve had my most successful post, I had a reach of 20,000, 25,000 views, recent success, and it was on a Friday evening. Friday at 8:00.

Michael Humblet:
Really? Because I don’t like the weekend.

Erendiz Ates:
And a lot of people …

Michael Humblet:
I tried so many times, it just doesn’t work.

Erendiz Ates:
Sunday is very tricky. Sunday, Saturday/Sunday is tricky.

Michael Humblet:
But Friday at that time?

Erendiz Ates:
But Friday, like normally, they have … like, normally, they have like, [inaudible 00:17:00] schedule has statistics about this, when do you need to post something on LinkedIn? And actually, they say in the morning, 8:00 till 9:00.

Michael Humblet:
They told me traffic hours, because people are [inaudible 00:17:09] you can’t do that, it’s not allowed.

Erendiz Ates:
Like that one. After like, 4:00, 5:00, it’s …

Michael Humblet:
Really? Because I always aim around lunch-ish time. But I’m not convinced it’s … I mean, I don’t know. I’m just trying, to see what happens.

Erendiz Ates:
Yeah, I’m trying to … Like, but the content itself is very important. So if your content suck, you can post on the perfect time, but if you don’t reach your target audience with your stories …

Michael Humblet:
Is there best practice advice on how to post? Should it be long? Should it be short? Should it be … How do you …

Erendiz Ates:
I have a strategy like, if you post text, long text, you have to start with a teaser headline. Like, if you want to tell something about … if you want to tell a story, like in the newspaper, you have a headline, you have to trigger people to read it.

Michael Humblet:
Like a hook, the hook, huh?

Erendiz Ates:
On LinkedIn, you only see the first couple of rules, like sentences, and they have to click see more to read the rest. A lot of people don’t click on see more, so all your time, your efforts are a waste of time, it’s gone. So with the teaser headline, like, for example, we did this one with Kim [inaudible 00:18:17] like, “Sitting back behind my desk all day is not my cup of tea.” [inaudible 00:18:23] your headline. And then you tell your story.

Michael Humblet:
I had a sales guy saying, “Why your cold calling sucks.” Loved it. Click and …

Erendiz Ates:
So and then you want to read. But if you immediately begin with your story and if you don’t tell a story, people won’t read it.

Michael Humblet:
Two more questions. One, sales navigator, do I need … Hang on, do I need the premium license or the … That’s a question I get every single day. It’s a mes for me. The LinkedIn guys, they are messing it up. Do I need a premium [inaudible 00:18:53] or do I need a sales navigator [inaudible 00:18:55]? Do I need them at all?

Erendiz Ates:
If you are an expert on LinkedIn … not like an expert like a trainer, but if you are very active on LinkedIn, yeah? And you are in a sales, a sales navigator or a premium, like the business, could be very interesting for you. But actually, you can do a lot with the freemium model. So it’s not that if you have a sales navigator or a premium that your sales will accelerate. No, it’s all about your activities, your input. So you reap what you sow on LinkedIn. So if you don’t put time in it, then you can have sales navigator, all the premiums, you can spend 100, $200 a month, nothing will happen.

Michael Humblet:
Yeah. So I used to have premium, then I switched to sales navigator, funnily enough, you have all the premium functions in the sales navigator at the same price. So here is some advice. But I agree. Sales navigator’s to build your lists and to proactively go search for people. But if you’re not doing that and you’re just posting to build credibility brand, you don’t need it. And [inaudible 00:19:52] agree.

Erendiz Ates:
And if your target audience is not active.

Michael Humblet:
Yeah, actually. Sometimes.

Erendiz Ates:
So you want to reach out to people, that not active, so why paying that?

Michael Humblet:
So what’s the thing, when you come into a company and they want to talk to you about LinkedIn and all the strategy, what’s the thing that frustrates you the most? What’s the thing that always comes back where you think, “Ah, there we go again.”

Erendiz Ates:
They want to see results in the short term. So they actually say, “Okay, in what time will I making more money?” And that question is very difficult.

Michael Humblet:
And then you have to push them back and say …

Erendiz Ates:
Yes, you have to change their mindset. I say, “It’s the long term, it’s not a sprint, it’s a marathon.” So we’re doing the marathon. So we’re doing a marathon, not a sprint, so you have to take this on the long term. That’s why when I go into companies, mostly it’s a workshop or training in two or three months. So I come, give a training, coaching, consultancy, come back in a month, and then give them homework. So they can try it out, they can … Yeah, they can implement it in their own strategy. And think about it, because a lot of companies don’t know what to post on LinkedIn, they don’t have a strategy.

Michael Humblet:
No, and that’s always a question they ask me, [inaudible 00:20:57] “How do you keep saying stuff?” It’s not that hard. I tell them, best advice is just answer questions of your customers.

Erendiz Ates:
Yes, that’s true.

Michael Humblet:
That’s it. And don’t overthink it.

Erendiz Ates:
[crosstalk 00:21:07]

Michael Humblet:
Overthinking is … that’s what slows them down.

Erendiz Ates:
Overthinking is very dangerous.

Michael Humblet:
Now you’re leaning for it, I’m going to take my big black book of difficult questions, I’m going to ask you the five questions that I always ask at the end. I mean, there’s a lot of stuff coming at you, so how do you focus? How do you bring focus to your business life?

Erendiz Ates:
In the beginning of being an entrepreneur, I offered a lot of solutions to my customers, like websites …

Michael Humblet:
Everything.

Erendiz Ates:
Making websites, like online branding. But now, I’m focusing on my niche, and my niche is LinkedIn. I want to be the best in LinkedIn, because I really believe in LinkedIn and I’m focusing mostly business to business. So my focus is clear now, and the content I read, the books I read, people I follow, is all key.

Michael Humblet:
Here on LinkedIn.

Erendiz Ates:
Yes, to become more skilled as a LinkedIn trainer, yeah.

Michael Humblet:
So as a next question, how do you say no? If I’m outside of that zone, how would you say no?

Erendiz Ates:
The good thing is, when you brand yourself on LinkedIn in the way you want to brand yourself, if you tell stories the way you want to tell your stories, you will attract people that you want to do business with.

Michael Humblet:
I fully agree, yeah. That’s [crosstalk 00:22:27].

Erendiz Ates:
So that’s the something cool, and I try to tell this to companies, because I don’t believe that you have to reach everybody on LinkedIn. So if I post something, I don’t post it to reach everybody, to do business with everybody, no. I want to add value to my target audience. If there are people who see my face and say, “Erendiz is a douchebag,” that’s cool. But I think there will be a couple of people who will say, “I like this one.” So the know, like, trust factor, also very important on LinkedIn. They have to get to know me, they have to get to like me, and then in the next phase, trust me and hopefully there will be a conversion. Now or in the future.

Michael Humblet:
Yep, I fully agree. What inspires you? Where do you go for inspiration? Let’s say it like that.

Erendiz Ates:
People like you?

Michael Humblet:
Good answer. At least one fan, right?

Erendiz Ates:
No, I really believe in surrounding me with experts in their fields. I’m the LinkedIn guy, but yeah, I’m like … with [inaudible 00:23:27] he’s a view marketeer, I learn a lot of him. I have a website guy now I work with. [crosstalk 00:23:35]

Michael Humblet:
It’s mainly geared to people, I mean, if it’s what you’re just been telling, it’s human, it’s faces, it’s people.

Erendiz Ates:
Yeah. That’s the personal approach and the sincere approach is very important. I’m young, I want to learn, and I don’t profile myself as an expert. I know a lot of LinkedIn, but only thing I do is telling other entrepreneurs what I’ve been doing the last couple of years.

Michael Humblet:
What’s the biggest mistake you’ve made up till now, you say “I’m never going to do that, I’m going to do it differently.”

Erendiz Ates:
Biggest mistake, that’s a good one, it’s a good question. I made a lot of mistakes. So I think one of the mistakes was doing something I don’t like to do. Like the websites, I did a lot of websites, couple of years. It was not my core business, I really don’t like to do it, but I really did it because I just wanted to do business. I said yes to everybody. Trying to do it myself, so working at night, weekends, spending a lot of time to do something that’s not really my core business. That was a mistake because I lost a lot of time. Okay, I had now, I have my experience, but it’s not my core business. I didn’t like this, I didn’t like it but it was a mistake. But I learned from it.

Michael Humblet:
I mean, you said focus is all [inaudible 00:24:57].

Erendiz Ates:
Because now, I see a lot of entrepreneurs who are beginning as a company, and they have services, but I really don’t know like a photographer, you have … or for like a video guy, you have a lot of niches in video marketing, you have a lot of niches in photography. People are looking for what am I good at, what do I want to do? And it was the same with me. Like social media, you have Facebook, you have Instagram, you have LinkedIn. So for me, LinkedIn was, from the beginning, my number one. And there are not a lot of LinkedIn ambassadors of my age in Belgium, so that helps.

Michael Humblet:
True. So you found your niche. So where can we learn more about you or your company?

Erendiz Ates:
I have a website.

Michael Humblet:
[inaudible 00:25:38] on LinkedIn.

Erendiz Ates:
Yes, yes. First on LinkedIn, of course, Erendiz Ates. You can find me on LinkedIn. My website, www.az-solutions.be, it’s www.az-solutions.be. And of course, Instagram and Facebook.

Michael Humblet:
Okay, perfect. Thanks for joining the show, it was a pleasure having you. I’m absolutely convinced LinkedIn, especially for B2B, can give you a lot of scale and thus, personal branding, because I believe that personal branding [inaudible 00:26:10] leadership is … it’s going to be huge in the future to do sales, actually. And it’s again, the trust and when they have trust, people can buy. With that, if you like what you’ve seen, give it a thumbs up, subscribe for a lot more, and I’ll see you next time.

Erendiz Ates:
See you on LinkedIn.

Michael Humblet:
On LinkedIn.

2019-09-24T10:50:10+02:00June 21st, 2019|

About the Author:

Michael Humblet is obsessed with designing, building and scaling sales engines and founder of Chaomatic, focused on unlocking & maximizing revenue growth trusted by over +207 companies. He is a seasoned sales strategist who served in different Sales Leadership functions. Michael Humblet is the host of The Sales Acceleration Show, the sales and marketing focused Q&A show on how to accelerate your business.
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