Pricing is a key element in your go to market. Laurent-David, CEO of Pricingpact, joins the Sales Acceleration show to discuss how to build the ultimate software pricing. He covers many topics like value-based pricing, pricing levels, Pricing strategies, how to find the right price point, pricing for start-ups & scale-ups,…

The 3 approaches to pricing are: 

– A cost-plus approach, looking at the cost and adding a margin on top
– Competitive based pricing, looking at your competitors and tune your pricing based on these
– Value-based pricing, understand the perceived value of your product and from there deduct the price

What is the ultimate pricing strategy for your software

Michael Humblet:
Welcome to the Sales Acceleration show. My name is Michael Humblet, and I’m the founder of Chaomatic. And in this show we’ll do everything to accelerate your business. And one of the biggest topics that always comes back every single day is pricing. So it’s about time I invite some pricing experts in the show to ask all the tough questions. So introduce yourself to our viewers, and tell us what you do.

Laurent-David :
Hi, I’m Laurent-David Hostyn.I’m the founder and CEO of Pricing Pact, who are pricing experts. So we had companies to improve their pricing capabilities to achieve more revenue or more profit.

Michael Humblet:
And how does that work? So I’ll tell you the questions I get. So I’m looking at my product and at a certain day I’m thinking, “Something’s wrong with this pricing.” So what do you guys do then?

Laurent-David :
Actually the two big cases, the first one is a company that is already selling the product, or the service, or the app. So it means that they are already a finished product, and already have a price and clients. In this case, we help them to optimize their pricing. They might be completely wrong.

Michael Humblet:
And optimization means it can go up, or it can go down?

Laurent-David :
Both. We don’t know. Actually, it depends on the strategy of the company.

Michael Humblet:
Yeah.

Laurent-David :
It depends if they chase more volume, or more revenue, or more profit. And depending on the strategy, we will advise them to adopt a pricing strategy, the right pricing strategically. And that’s the first case.

Laurent-David :
The second case is innovation pricing. It’s when a company is putting a product or service for the first time on the market.

Michael Humblet:
And they have no clue.

Laurent-David :
And they have no clue. And actually even existing companies that are innovating companies every year they launch new products, new services. So every year again is the same pain. How should we price it? And that’s how we help them.

Michael Humblet:
Just before the show, you mentioned something to me. That most companies are underpricing, that you’ve seen as a pattern of actually you’re able to ask more.

Laurent-David :
Yes. It’s particularly startups, actually startups and scale ups. There’s a paradox with that. They create a lot of value for the clients. They try to be better than the existing competition, existing solutions. So they create a lot of value, but at the same time they would like to have some volume on the first sale. So they under price. And it creates a program because yes they have the first sales but at a price that is really low compared to the value they deliver. And they keep growing with that low price, and they repeat the same mistake. And then yeah, they can even scale with a price that is not correct. And hence, it means a lot of money he slept on the table, they could have reached much more revenue, with exactly the same volume, the same effort just with the better pricing.

Michael Humblet:
How do you guys do it? Is it interviews? And then there is some mathematics and intelligence stuff of course.

Laurent-David :
Yes, indeed. Before going to that I think it’s good to have a good idea of the three main approach of pricing.

Michael Humblet:
Yeah.

Laurent-David :
The first one is the cost plus approach. So most of most companies they look at the cost, they target the margin and then they deduct the price. Other companies, what they do, they do competitive based pricing. They look at the competition, one, two, three, maybe five competitors. They look at the price and then they say, “Okay, we will be cheaper than the competition or more expensive than the competition.” And that’s it.

Laurent-David :
But actually there’s a third way to do pricing is called value based pricing. Is to understand the perceived value of your service, of your product. And from there you can deduct the right price.

Michael Humblet:
And did you perceived?

Laurent-David :
Perceived value, not only deliver it. The perception is very, very important. And actually is the best way to do pricing, but indeed it’s the most complex one.

Laurent-David :
So how to do it. Yes, we do it through interviews. It’s special questionnaires so we can understand the purchase decision process of the buyers. If you do that with 10 people, 100 people, 1000 people, you can have really strong and very powerful statistics. And then you can optimize the pricing according to the perceived value.

Michael Humblet:
Is there a difference between B to B and B to C? Because of course I mean it seems different.

Laurent-David :
Actually, the approach is not that different a in both case you have to target the decision makers, and understand how the think. And the weight of the price in their purchase decision process. And in most of the case we understand that the price is not in the top three drivers actually. Especially in B to B, the quality of the service, the speed, a lot of other things come before the price. And you have to understand that to avoid that mistake to underprice. And as we said, it’s about the perceived value. So understanding that you know how to communicate with your leads. You defend the value. And then you discuss about the price. But start by defending your value.

Michael Humblet:
I can’t imagine in if you do the questionnaire, are you the approach in B to B. It must be tougher than in B to C, because in B to B you’re sitting somewhere in the department and you think, “Why on earth should I answer these guys. And then probably going to charge me more.” Something like that.

Laurent-David :
Yeah. Actually it’s a bit tricky. When when you approach your respondents we don’t come saying, “Okay, hey we are price impact, and we we are doing a survey to help our clients to-”

Michael Humblet:
“We want to know how much we should charge you.”

Laurent-David :
Yeah. We we come to understand what they value the most and the least. And actually they don’t understand it will be a good benefit for them at the end. And when you have a good value based pricing strategy, actually it’s like balance. You end up with a win, win situation on both sides. On the client side, and on provider side.

Laurent-David :
If the client agrees with the value, he will agree with the new price. Yeah. But if you always felt that the value was low and the price too high as the provider, you will understand that you should maybe decrease your price. Or remove some elements of your service. And then you will have different offer and different prices.

Michael Humblet:
Is there a pattern you see? We talked about startups and they under price most of the time. Is there a pattern with bigger companies, they overprice? What do you see?

Laurent-David :
Yeah. Indeed, there’s a pattern. Big companies at the moment, they don’t understand that the perceived value is decreasing with time. And they try to keep the price high. And sometimes they even tried to increase the price, because the cost increased.

Michael Humblet:
Yeah.

Laurent-David :
So that’s really the companies that have a cost plus approach. And they don’t understand the needs of the market, and that the market is changing and challenging them. And then there’s a problem happening, they lose market shares, et cetera. So usually indeed, big companies will establish companies put a price too high because they are too disconnected from the market.

Laurent-David :
And actually yeah, that’s what we recommend. We recommend to all the companies to iterate on their pricing, and with that value based pricing approach. So they will understand that the market is changing, that they should maybe change the product or the service to increase the value, and the perceived value [crosstalk 00:07:30].

Michael Humblet:
So if I’m looking at a product and I’ve been trying to figure out pricing, what would be your advice? Is there anything you say, “Okay, start there, have a go at this, try that.”

Laurent-David :
The first advice is dare to ask your leads. If they would pay for your prototype. Don’t wait to have your product finished. You can already ask, with the concept. Even with the picture, you can ask. Most of the startups or young entrepreneurs, they go to see relatives, friends and they say, “Okay, do you like my product?”

Michael Humblet:
Of course?

Laurent-David :
They say, “Yes, yes, of course.”

Laurent-David :
“Would you pay for that?”

Laurent-David :
“Not sure.” So already with that kind of question, you can understand if you can monetize your product or not. But of course don’t ask that only to your relative. Ask that to 10, 20 people.

Michael Humblet:
Multiple people.

Laurent-David :
And it doesn’t take that much time, maybe one week. And you can avoid a lot of mistakes by doing that. And most of the startups they don’t dare to ask that question. They stop just before that weird question. But it’s so, so important to ask that really early. And to keep going asking the people about the price. What do you think about my price? Dare to ask. That’s the first advice.

Michael Humblet:
First advice. Dare to ask. Second one?

Laurent-David :
Second one.

Michael Humblet:
If you say one there must be two.

Laurent-David :
Yes, yes there are many actually. Second one is your strategy has to be really clear as soon as possible. Most of the the startups, they think that the right strategies to chase volume. They think, “Okay, if we have the volume, we will have the revenue, we will have the profit.” It’s not true at all.

Laurent-David :
You can have a lot of volume but a 1 million multiplied by zero euro. It doesn’t give you any revenue. And when you understand that, if you ask yourself the right questions, you will see that you will adopt a completely different pricing strategy. So it has to be very clear. If you want profit, if you didn’t raise any funds and you need profit to grow, you will adopt another pricing strategy.

Michael Humblet:
Because if I make the jump to like SAS software-

Laurent-David :
Yup.

Michael Humblet:
… they have a lot of these acquired upsell strategies. Where you actually almost give something almost for free so you can up sell them stuff. Because that goes against what you’re just saying.

Laurent-David :
Yeah. That’s a strategy actually they try to serve different segments. Normally they should adapt that approach by understanding that there are different segments. That some people don’t value yet the solution, but would like to try a few things. So don’t give everything about your solution. Don’t ask too much about it.

Laurent-David :
But other people has a really good… perceive it at, I mean give a lot of value to the solution, and are already willing to pay. And that should be the approach. Understand who are the people already willing to pay. And who are the people that are not yet ready to pay, and change your package accordingly.

Michael Humblet:
And you would advise to just try it. Sometimes I say to salespeople, “You don’t know. Maybe just double the price, see what happens.”

Laurent-David :
Yeah. You try and ask. You really need to ask. And actually they are techniques to understand. So let me get back to that case. The SAS, we have more, more companies having a SAS model. And you have to design those packages, and put a price on these packages.

Laurent-David :
And a good way to ask is to force the respondent to make trade offs between options. Let me give you an example with cars. Okay. You prefer BMW or Audi?

Michael Humblet:
BMW.

Laurent-David :
BMW. Let’s say you have a budget of 20,000 euro for a new car.

Michael Humblet:
Not gong to get that with the BMW.

Laurent-David :
I’m sorry.

Michael Humblet:
You’ll need more for BMW.

Laurent-David :
It depends which one. If it’s CR-1 or an Audi A3. so you prefer BMW?

Michael Humblet:
Yeah.

Laurent-David :
Let’s say you have 20,000. Do you prefer to buy a CR-1 BMW at 20,000? Or a Audi A3 at 18,000.

Michael Humblet:
With more options?

Laurent-David :
Same options in both cases.

Michael Humblet:
Take BM.

Laurent-David :
You take the BM, but it’s 2000 more expensive.

Michael Humblet:
Yes.

Laurent-David :
Because you like the brand?

Michael Humblet:
Probably. Yes.

Laurent-David :
And you are willing to pay 2000 euro are more for the brand.

Michael Humblet:
Yeah.

Laurent-David :
Now if I tell you in the Audi A3, it’s full option. And in BMW no option.

Michael Humblet:
Then I probably go to the A3.

Laurent-David :
Okay. So okay, I can understand that the option, you give a lot of value to the options.

Michael Humblet:
Yes.

Laurent-David :
And here actually we covered only four attributes. The brand, the model, the price and the options. Actually we can cover 10, 100 attributes. And that’s what the brain is doing when they choose. And when you develop a SAS company, that’s what you need to understand.how the people that are choosing between the different packages. And what’s the weight of the price… between all the different attributes.

Michael Humblet:
That’s why in SAS you see a lot of these standard and then pro becomes bigger, and then you need a corporate goes all the way down.

Laurent-David :
So the challenge there actually, is what you put in the packages. And which price you put in each packages.

Michael Humblet:
There you go.

Laurent-David :
And the answer is in the head of the customers. And not one customer, not 10 try to have 30, 40 people. The opinion of a certain number of respondents. And then you will see, wow, actually the people, they value that option a lot and are really willing to pay for that option.

Michael Humblet:
And probably it’s different than what they think. I’m guessing.

Laurent-David :
Very, very different.

Michael Humblet:
Because they’re developing, developing. Think this is the main feature, but actually…

Laurent-David :
We saw some cases you said, “Okay, sometimes you advise, okay, double price.” And we had some case where, I mean to us quantified, could triple the price with our any problem.

Michael Humblet:
Because I can imagine if you say that they’ll have a big smile, but they’re afraid of doing it.

Laurent-David :
No.

Michael Humblet:
Are they, because you have the numbers?

Laurent-David :
Exactly we have facts.

Michael Humblet:
Because I would be crying, because I’ve lost so much money in the last-

Laurent-David :
Yes. That’s a big difference that most of the companies don’t understand that. But they don’t know how to adopt the real value based pricing approach. They understand, “Okay we need package with different personas. We need different price points, et cetera.” But they don’t know how to have the right answers. And the answers in the head of the customer. So, dare to ask in the right way.

Laurent-David :
Really, because especially if you are scaling, it’s better to ask your ten first customers, or 50 first customers. Before repeating that mistake for the 1000 next customers. So dare to ask, even if you might lose some customers. But you know that you are scaling ask, ask, get the answers, optimize your pricing. And before it’s too late.

Michael Humblet:
And when should you do a review? When should you review pricing?

Laurent-David :
Often.

Michael Humblet:
Often. What is often?

Laurent-David :
Often. What most companies they spend less than 10 hours per on their pricing.

Michael Humblet:
Yeah.

Laurent-David :
Less than 10 hours.

Michael Humblet:
And then a guy like me walks in and say, “Hey, Michael, do you know something about pricing?”

Michael Humblet:
“Mm-hmm (affirmative).” And it’s got feel.

Laurent-David :
Yes. And actually why they don’t spend that much time on pricing is, first they don’t realize the importance of pricing. What is the most impactful profit driver. Secondly, they don’t have the skills or the people.

Michael Humblet:
Or they don’t even know where to go.

Laurent-David :
They don’t know, because there are not that many things are on internet or in books. It’s crazy.

Michael Humblet:
Which by the way is a great opportunity for you guys to talk about it. Fill the gap.

Laurent-David :
Yes, clearly. And they don’t have the right tools, neither. When companies are doing their pricing, usually they do that on paper, or maybe on an Excel sheet and that’s it. But once you realize that, you start to develop your own tool, your own process. And the best companies, they review the price on a monthly basis.

Michael Humblet:
Monthly?

Laurent-David :
Yes, yes. You can, because especially if you are growing fast, you have more customers. Probably you have more segments that fill needs.

Michael Humblet:
But then to be a bit critical here, if you have I mean, a lot of SAS companies have their pricing online.

Laurent-David :
Yep.

Michael Humblet:
If you have to change it every month, it’s becoming a mess, because you internally. Then who ordered, at what? I mean I can imagine lots of issues in the background.

Laurent-David :
Yeah, but there’s good issues. If it help you to have much more revenue, much more profits, when you realize that you like to to face those kinds of issues. And actually indeed there’s a challenge of communication. On your pricing page, usually you put three or four different prices. That would be very, very clear, very simple. However, it doesn’t mean that you don’t have-

Michael Humblet:
Less is more? Sorry. Less is more? Meaning two is better than three or four?

Laurent-David :
No.

Michael Humblet:
No. It doesn’t matter. Three or four.

Laurent-David :
Three or four, yes. But it doesn’t mean that you have only three or four price points. You can have much more. We see more and more pricing page with some options and when you click on it, you see the pricing changing. And actually you should have a really good pricing model in the backend. And then you understand that you can have 100 to 1000 different price points.

Michael Humblet:
That’s a very good one. Should it then be, I would think if you see a pricing it should be easy to understand.

Laurent-David :
Yes.

Michael Humblet:
Because if so many options and clicks and after awhile people get lost to say, “How much is it now?” I mean that’s the worst question in sales can get. “How much does it cost now? I can’t follow.” And then you have to start explaining the whole model and all of that. So you should avoid that. No?

Laurent-David :
Yes, you should avoid that. You should avoid, that start to be a mess in the head of the customer. But you have to work on it, on the communication of your pricing and really, even if your pricing model is very complex, you can display it in a very easy way. Nice way.

Laurent-David :
Think about the air plane tickets. When you Google, when you go on the websites, then flight ticket to see only one price. And you knew that tomorrow it will be different. The model behind it is very complex. Changing every minute. But it’s simply displayed.

Michael Humblet:
I booked the hotel yesterday on bold.com. No, not bold booking.com. And boy, oh boy, that was like one mess. Pricing changed the whole time. And I mean I was like looking like Jesus Christ.

Laurent-David :
Yeah, they’re already in the extreme.

Michael Humblet:
That is really funky.

Laurent-David :
Yeah. They’re already in the future compared to other industries. But other industry are really lagging behind. And we don’t advise today startups to have a dynamic pricing. So the price changing every day.

Michael Humblet:
But I think dynamic pricing and transactional business, okay. But like in I mean that’s in a SAS. Or in a say more established this stuff, of course.

Laurent-David :
Yeah.

Michael Humblet:
Yeah.

Laurent-David :
And actually, if you ask if you have internally pricing workshops every month, you would ask yourself the right questions. And it’s not only about price. You will better understand why the perceived value is high or low. You will review your products, you will review your communication, you will train better, your sales team. Really having pricing workshop triggers a lot of things.

Michael Humblet:
While you’re talking, I’ve been thinking the whole time about, should you have different pricing? Like the saying in French, a la tete, du client. On the head of the client. So, “I know this company can pay more than that company.” Is that something you should do or you should avoid?

Laurent-David :
No, you should do.

Michael Humblet:
You should do.

Laurent-David :
Yes that’s a perfect value based pricing approach. Should to try to understand why one customer is willing to pay more than another one. There is something, there is a reason. You need to try to understand that. And if you understand that you can use that when you are selling your product, your service. And he will accept it. And, if you understand the difference between the two customers, both will accept the different prices.

Michael Humblet:
If I would take that to the extremes, you should say if I have a thousand customers, I should have a thousand different prices.

Laurent-David :
Exactly.

Michael Humblet:
So that’s actually the ultimate.

Laurent-David :
Yes.

Michael Humblet:
Completely changeable model.

Laurent-David :
That’s a perfectly optimized pricing. Yes.

Michael Humblet:
I mean from a sales point of view, I mean from a process point of view, it’s a tough one to implement.

Laurent-David :
Yes.

Michael Humblet:
I’m just thinking, “Please don’t hire me to do this right, ask them.” Because pragmatically, I’m going nuts. But actually I mean it’s the right way, right?

Laurent-David :
Yes. It’s shocking the first time, man. Most companies are not used to that. But there are many cases where they succeeded at doing that. And those companies are the most profitable.

Michael Humblet:
Actually thinking about cars. I was in a very luxurious brand of car with a friend of mine. We were looking into, I mean he would buy a car. And I realized if you go to BMW and A3 all these, let’s say more standard brands, they always have packages, sports, business, corporate, I don’t know what. And then they give you a discount. But this luxurious brand and we actually visited to, they didn’t have any of that. They just said, “What options do you want?” And they had a price per option, pretty long list. And actually I’m pretty sure if they would have combined, they would have lost money.

Michael Humblet:
And this way you could do the most insane stuff and they said, “Yeah, you need a clock. Oh yeah, you need that expensive clock in the dashboard.” Why? Because you can.

Michael Humblet:
So actually it is, they have a price, every customer pay something completely different.

Laurent-David :
Yes.

Michael Humblet:
I don’t think they have any standard.

Laurent-David :
No.

Michael Humblet:
Except the base model. But nobody buys the base model.

Laurent-David :
Yeah, they understood it correctly, how to do that. And really it’s possible in other industries too. You just need to start thinking like that.

Michael Humblet:
But my customers are going to hate me if I start saying, “Guys you need to flip the pricing model completely.”

Laurent-David :
[inaudible 00:21:55] my point is very important. It’s, you can develop a real complex pricing model, but communicate simply with the customer. And you need to discuss about the value, understand. And actually the customers, they value that. That you care about them, and feel like it’s completely tailor made for them. And then they understand that the price is different also for them.

Michael Humblet:
Yep.

Laurent-David :
And it’s possible to develop that in a lot of industries.

Michael Humblet:
Is there something that when you go to customers that really, that you know, you can have that frustrates you. Every single time they say the same stuff or they have the same opinion on something, and you know it’s wrong.

Laurent-David :
Yeah.

Michael Humblet:
What would that be?

Laurent-David :
Most of the companies… yeah.

Michael Humblet:
Let it out, all out.

Laurent-David :
Yeah. With other companies, yeah. Yeah. But the competition.

Michael Humblet:
Yeah, it’s the first thing I would think, actually.

Laurent-David :
Yeah. And okay, give me five of your competitors and four startups, usually they stop at two or three or they say, “We don’t have competition.” So, okay. So we can not look at the competition.

Laurent-David :
Or when they list them, actually it’s not relevant to take them into account. We, we met a startup, they thought about a competitor that was based in Australia. It’s not relevant at all.

Michael Humblet:
No.

Laurent-David :
And don’t base your pricing on that company in Australia, which is a small company. It’s not relevent at all. Another thing-

Michael Humblet:
So, let me ask you a challenging question here. You come to me and then I say, “Okay, I have three competition. It’s a very highly competitive market.” And your study reveals that I should double my price.

Michael Humblet:
Then you should say, “Do it.” Even if my competitors stay low.

Laurent-David :
Yes.

Michael Humblet:
So you are bold and say…

Laurent-David :
Yes. Yes. And I would suggest that.

Michael Humblet:
You have to have a strong character to say that.

Laurent-David :
Yes. But because I will have the facts.

Michael Humblet:
Yeah.

Laurent-David :
I will ask the clients, how they compare with the competition. And I will understand what the value in your company that they don’t value in the others. And it would be based on fact. It’s not like, “Okay, I think that.” We have the facts. “We interviewed 10 people or 50 or 100 people. And it’s clear, you are much better than the competition. They value that, and are willing to pay for that.”

Michael Humblet:
Yeah.

Laurent-David :
So, even if you’re a startup, if you are new, wow your product or you solution is so amazing that they just wait for it, and they’re willing to pay for that. So avoid that mistake to align with the competition. Deliver much more value and it’s perceived. So go for it.

Michael Humblet:
You know, you guys have one big issue. I mean now the first thing we’re going to do is check your pricing page and see if it changes every single time.

Laurent-David :
Every day.

Michael Humblet:
I mean every day. I love it.

Michael Humblet:
Okay. At the end I always, I get out my big black Bible with the tough questions and ask very similar questions to my guests. First one is there’s so much going on. I mean you have a startup actually. I mean it’s going to scale up. How do you focus? How do you bring folks to what you’re doing?

Laurent-David :
We are lucky with a really good coach.

Michael Humblet:
Yeah.

Laurent-David :
I think it helps a lot to focus pricing, it’s a huge industry actually. It’s niche for us. There are not that many pricing experts, but you can have B to B companies, B to C companies, startups, scale ups, SMEs, large corporates. The demand is high, but we need focus. We provide services but also solutions.

Michael Humblet:
And you know what they say the richness is in the niches.

Laurent-David :
Yes. And yeah, we have a really good coach that helps us.

Michael Humblet:
Cool. So, and how do you say no? That’s a tough one.

Laurent-David :
Yeah. It’s… easier to say no when we know that we want to have a lot of impact. We really would like to provoke a lot of impact, positive impact, measurable impact. And when we think it’s not possible for multiple reasons, we simply say no.

Michael Humblet:
Go to our competitor, he’s is going to do it. Keep them busy.

Laurent-David :
Or do it yourself.

Michael Humblet:
Yeah, here is movie explaining it.

Laurent-David :
Yes. I know. Either call back in a few months and that’s how we say no.

Michael Humblet:
What inspires you? Where do you get your inspiration?

Laurent-David :
The impacts, actually. And we surprisingly we can trigger so many things, can have so much impact in the company. Not only financial impacts. You reduce the adopts, you can decrease the favorite rates of startups or even big companies. And it means you improve the company. They can hire more people. People understand that they can produce better products, better service. Really, the impacts are multiple and that what drives us.

Michael Humblet:
Yup. What’s your biggest mistake you’ve done that you say, “I’m never gonna do that again.”

Laurent-David :
Yeah.

Michael Humblet:
Work, not privately.

Laurent-David :
Yeah, yeah. I made many mistakes. But it was great learnings. It’s to build the wrong team. Team is ultra important if you want to grow. And be careful when you-

Michael Humblet:
When you hire.

Laurent-David :
… find, yeah, or your cofounders. when you hire people, it’s better to take time than to jump on the first people. And I made some mistakes in the past. And now I’m much more careful with that.

Michael Humblet:
Pretty cool. And so where can we learn more about you or your company?

Laurent-David :
On our Linkedin page. Also on our website. We are quite active on Instagram too.

Michael Humblet:
Just name the website again, the URL.

Laurent-David :
Pricingpact.com.

Michael Humblet:
Pricingpact.com, it’s on the cup, my friends. Think about branding straight away. Good. I love it. Okay. Thanks a lot.

Laurent-David :
You’re welcome.

Michael Humblet:
Actually, what sticks to me really sticks to me of hat you said is, if you have a thousand customers, you should have thousand different prices.

Laurent-David :
Yes.

Michael Humblet:
That’s something that really stuck. Which is an idea I never really thought through. So thanks a lot for coming to the show.

Laurent-David :
You’re welcome.

Michael Humblet:
If you like what you’ve seen, give it a thumbs up, subscribe for a lot more. And just think as of now, you need to change your pricing today.

2019-06-13T10:06:09+02:00April 28th, 2019|

About the Author:

Michael Humblet is obsessed with designing, building and scaling sales engines and founder of Chaomatic, focused on unlocking & maximizing revenue growth trusted by over +207 companies. He is a seasoned sales strategist who served in different Sales Leadership functions. Michael Humblet is the host of The Sales Acceleration Show, the sales and marketing focused Q&A show on how to accelerate your business.
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